• 91 Weatherly Club Dr, Alabaster, AL 35007

  • Feline Care Guide

  • We want to ensure that your cat  receives the absolute best care and treatment. Preventing illness in your cat is key to keeping your feline friend happy and healthy. Our cat care resources gives you the information you need to keep your cat happy and healthy in between regular veterinary visits.

  • Recommended vaccinations

    We believe on vaccinating based on life style or potential exposure.   All vaccines used at Weatherly Animal Hospital are FDA approved for the 1 year or 3 year duration.  What vaccines we use depends upon a number of things including the age, breed, and health status of the cat, the potential exposure of the cat to an animal that has the disease, the type of vaccine and how common the disease is in the geographical area where the cat lives or may visit. 

  • Litterbox training and socialization

    Unlike puppies, kittens are a snap to house-train. In fact, you don't really have to train a cat to use a litter box at all. Your cat's instincts to bury its stools will guide it to the sanitary litter box you have provided. Litter pans or boxes are available in a host of sizes and colors. Be sure to buy one that's at least 4 inches deep and large enough for your cat to use without being cramped for space. If you have multiple cats, aim for a litter box per cat, plus one additional, so there's always one available. Also, be sure to buy a litter pan that's easy to clean and sterilize.

    Socialization is an important part of cat training. Cat’s natural instincts are to fight or attack their prey. But if they are cooped up indoors they will not use their natural intuition which may lead to them fighting their owners or guests. If you ever have guests enter your home or outdoors make sure that they pay some sort of attention to your pet cat. This will help the cat by you training them to welcome visitors and not attacking them. Cats can be very territorial of their homes and if someone unusual enters their territory they become feisty and aggressive because hey think they are being attacked or replaced. To solve this issue introduce you cat to guests and make them feel comfortable by including them in your activities with your guests.

  • Routine feline health maintenance

    It's your job to keep your cat healthy and safe. As your trusted veterinarian we will guide you about grooming, vaccinations, parasite prevention, first aid and safety, routine physical exams & Preventive Health Care of your cat.

     

    During your cat's annual physical exam you should review these aspects of your cat's health:

    • Vaccination status and potential for exposure to disease (i.e., indoor or outdoor cat)
    • Parasite control for intestinal parasites, fleas, ticks, mites, and heartworms
    • Dental health – care you give at home; any mouth odors, pain, or other signs of disease you may have observed
    • Nutrition – including what your dog eats, how often, what supplements and treats are given, and changes in water consumption, weight, or appetite
    • Nutrition - including what your cat eats, how often, what supplements and treats are given, and changes in water consumption, weight or appetite
    • Exercise - how much exercise your cat receives including how often and what kind; and any changes in your cat's ability to exercise
    • Vaccination status and potential for exposure to disease (i.e., indoor or outdoor cat)
    • Ears and Eyes - any discharge, discomfort or pain, redness, swelling, or itching
    • Stomach and intestines - any vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, gas, belching, or abnormal stools
    • Breathing - any coughing, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, sneezing, or nasal discharge
    • Vaccination status and potential for exposure to disease (i.e., indoor or outdoor cat)
    • Breathing - any coughing, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, sneezing, or nasal discharge
    • Behavior - any behavior problems such as inappropriate elimination, aggression, or changes in temperament
    • Feet and legs - any limping, weakness, toenail problems
    • Coat and skin - any hair loss, pigment changes, lumps, itchy spots, shedding, mats, changes in hair quality, or anal sac problems
    • Urogenital - any discharges, heats, changes in mammary glands, urination difficulties or changes, neutering if it has not already been performed
    • Blood tests - especially for geriatric cats, those with medical problems, and those who are receiving medications
  • Exercise and nutrition

    Eating right and staying fit with regular exercise is not just good advice for people, it is good advice for pets too. Maintaining a healthy weight, eating high quality nutritious foods, and keeping a strong body through exercise are cornerstones to wellness throughout a lifetime. How much exercise is enough depends on your dog’s age, breed, and health. 

    As Americans struggle with being one of the most overweight nations in the world, our perspective of our pet’s weight is also changing. According to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP) pet obesity rates have been rising for several years. As of 2012, 58 percent of cats are either overweight or obese, and 22 percent of owners said their pet was normal weight when their cat was actually overweight.

    These extra pounds put our pets at increased risk for many of the same diseases people who encounter obesity face, including a life expectancy shortened by 2.5 years. It is not a matter of “if” a pet will contract one of the diseases listed below, it is more a matter of “when” a pet will contract the disease if he keeps the pounds on.

    • Arthritis
    • Cranial cruciate ligament injury
    • Diabetes
    • High blood pressure
    • Heart and respiratory disease
    • Kidney disease
    • Certain Cancers – especially intra-abdominal cancers